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Chinese-American Museum of Chicago

Raymond B. & Jean T. Lee Center

The mission of the Chinese-American Museum of Chicago (CAMOC) is to promote the culture and history––through exhibitions, education, and research––of Chinese-Americans in the Midwest. The museum building, formerly the Quong Yick Co., is located in Chicago's Chinatown, at 238 West 23rd Street in Chicago. The Museum opened to the public on May 21, 2005. After a devastating fire in September of 2008, the Museum was closed for renovation and reopened in 2010.

CAMOC is governed by the Board of Directors of the Chinatown Museum Foundation (CMF), a 501(C)(3) non-profit corporation located in Chicago, Illinois.

 

Eurasian Book Talk

Eurasian Book Talk

Eurasian

Mixed Identities in the United States, China and Hong Kong,

1842-1943

EMMA JINHUA TENG

“Beautifully written and thoughtfully crafted, Teng’s Eurasian is a pleasure to read. The author has written a nuanced, multisided account of mixed families and Eurasian identities that will be important reading for students in U.S. and Chinese history and in Asian, Asian American, and Ethnic Studies.”

Kornel Chang, author of Pacific Connections: The Making of the U.S.-Canadian Borderlands

“By examining Eurasian identities from Chines and Ameri- can perspectives, Emma Teng offers a truly transnational and multicultural intellectual project.”

Evelyn Hu-DeHart, editor of Across the Pacific: Asian Americans and Globalization

In the second half of the nineteenth century, global labor migration, trade and overseas study brought China and the United States into close contract, leading to new cross-cultural encounters that brought mixed-race families into being. Yet the stories of these families remain largely unknown. How did interracial families negotiate their identities within these societies when mixed-race marriage was taboo and “Eurasian” often a derisive term?

In Eurasian, Emma Jinhua Teng compares Chinese-Western mixed-race families in the United States, China, and Hong Kong, examining both the range of ideas that shaped the formation of Eurasian identities in these diverse context, and the claims set forth by individual Eurasians concerning their own identities.

Teng argues that Eurasian were not universally marginalized during this ear, as is often asserted. Rather, Eurasians often found themselves facing contradiction between exclusionary and inclusive ideologies of race and nationality, and between overt racism and more subtle forms of prejudice that were counterbal- anced by partial acceptance and privilege.

Emma Jinghua Teng is a MacVicar Faculty Fellow and the T.T. and Wei Fong Chao Professor of Asian Civilization and Associ- ate Professor of Chinese Studies at MIT and the author of Taiwan’s Imagined Geography: Chinese Colonial Travel Writing and Pictures, 1683-1895 ( Harvard, 2004)

 

Have You Eaten Yet?

Read what Bill Daley of the Chicago Tribune said about our cookbook. Click here (works best in Internet Explorer)



Thoughtful gift for any occasion.

Price is $15 plus tax. Shipping is $4.99 per two book order.

Place your order by calling (312) 949 1000 or email office@ccamuseum.org.


Have You Eaten Yet? Cookbook Sale

 

Amazon Smiles

Do you shop at Amazon.com?


If you are doing your holiday shopping at Amazon.com, please consider using Amazon Smiles to benefit the Chinatown Museum Foundation.


Click to enlarge
Amazon will donate 0.5% of the price of your eligible AmazonSmile purchases to Chinatown Museum Foundation whenever you shop on AmazonSmile..

 

Please use this link before you shop at Amazon.com  http://smile.amazon.com/ch/36-4492615


 

Traditional Chinese Festivals: A Celebration of Culture * NOW OPEN *

First Floor - Traditional Chinese Festivals: A Celebration of Culture

Traditional Chinese Festivals: A Celebration of Culture

 

My Chinatown: Stories from Within––Now Open!

Second Floor - My Chinatown: Stories from Within

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Thanks to a generous grant from the Chicago Community Trust, the Chinese-American Museum of Chicago is collaborating with the Chicago History Museum to bring its wonderful object theater and 16-minute video My Chinatown to the Chinese-American Museum of Chicago! Hear the stories of the people of Chinatown––their journeys, their customs, their work, their families––from within Chinatowns borders.

CAMOC is adding a special feature to the exhibit: a look at family associations in Chinatown. As an outgrowth of the Chicago Chinatown Centennial Exhibit, we will be highlighting, on a rotating basis, the histories and artifacts of various family associations, including the Lees, the Wongs, and more.

My Chinatown: Stories from Within is now open in the second floor gallery.

Hear the people of Chinatown tell their own stories,  right in the heart of their neighborhood

 

Exhibit News: Great Wall to Great Lakes

The Chinese-American Museum\'s permanent exhibit, Great Wall to Great Lakes: Chinese Immigration to the Midwest tells the stories of immigrant journeys to the Chicago area and beyond.

.GWGL

 

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